Talking to Relatives about Assisted Living

Assisted living specialists at Ravenswood Care Center do not know when it is time to start discussing the issue with your elderly relatives. You are in the only position to decide, particularly if your loved ones cannot make the choice themselves, or they have trouble doing so. The most common concerns are overwhelming relatives with new information and getting into an argument about. Surely, you want the best options for their care, and there are several ways of discussing assisted living options effectively and amicably. All things considered, assisted living conversations are heavy, so use the questions posed and answered below to guide you through the process. Can we start a conversation? Another primary concern for people who want to have the assisted living conversation is that the relative is not ready to launch to have it. They are either hesitant or resistant to making the decision altogether. Start by accepting that the planning process could take multiple conversations and over a substantial interval. Then, plan the first conversation with the most opportune time and place you can think off, meanwhile trying to eliminate stress and other timely obligations. Ultimately, you should always ask one question first: Can we have a conversation about assisted living? You may be met with opposition, but in the best case scenario, your relative may meet the possibility openly and care about talking to you. Try to remember that the future does not have to be some threatening part of life. Some seniors are able—or at least think so—to look after themselves without any general assistance, or professional nursing care for that matter. A conversation about assisted living should be cooperative, and should not seem urgent, unless your situation calls for it. Finally, do your best to reassure your loved one that a decision is not immediately imperative. How do you feel about assisted living? A conversation about assisted living can be overwhelming in its own right for the person involved, so try not to bombard him or her with too much information or advice. Remind your relative that you value their opinions and wishes, because the primary concern among many seniors is that moving to an assisted living facility will destroy their sense of independence. Be sensitive to the fact that the looming and subsequently frightening idea of selecting a living space will seem like someone’s final residence. Even when people recognize the...
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Tips for Helping Your Loved One Transition

Even after you have found the perfect assisted living facility for your loved one, the transition of moving into it is often difficult for them. They might have mixed feelings about leaving a home they shared with a partner who is now gone and the memories associated with it. They may also fear the unknown that comes along with a change in lifestyle. Ravenswood Care Center offers a distinctly homey environment with an attentive and caring staff. They know that once your loved one gets over the adjustment period, they will flourish in their new surroundings. There are many simple steps you can take to help make this transition easier for them. Help With Packing – Packing is one of the most laborious and dreaded aspects of moving. Offer to help your loved one with this, but as long as they are mentally able let them take the reins while you act as the workhorse. Start by asking them how they want to sort everything, for example, things to keep and things to get rid of. Do not judge their decisions and work with them to get the job done. This also allows you some added quality time with your loved one. Get Excited – Ask the facility for a list of activities and a schedule before your loved one moves in. Talk about these events with them and encourage them to plan on getting involved. For example, Ravenswood Care Center offers trips to the library, this is something to highlight if your loved one is an avid reader. Get excited about the activities for them and they may begin to look forward to them as well. Help Them Get Settled – Help them set up their new accommodations. As with packing, you should let them take the lead on this aspect. Hang their pictures on the wall, or make their bed but let them decide where items should go. You want your loved one to begin experiencing their independence in this facility as soon as possible, so pay attention to any indications they want you to leave. Organize a House Warming Celebration – Plan a small gathering to celebrate your loved one’s new home about a week after they move in. Ask them if there is anyone from the facility they want you to invite. An inclusive party is a great way for them to make more friends....
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Myths Surrounding Aging and Fitness Debunked

Entering the later stages of life leaves many people feeling dissatisfied with their fitness levels, particularly those who used to be very athletic. Although the possibilities are limited to different extents depending on the individual, finding the motivation is the first step. According to the team at Ravenswood Care Center, many geriatric individuals feel that exercise is futile in that they will not see results. However, caring about fitness will create fitness, even for elderly individuals. Conferred below are some myths about fitness and old age that are misleading to say the least, so the truth about staying fit as we age follows. It’s too late … There is no conclusive evidence that supports the myth that the body will not respond to exercise as it ages. It should go without saying that elderly individuals will not be able to compete at a level of their younger counterparts. However, a healthy fitness routine will offer physical and mental benefits, even if we cannot remain in perfect shape as we age. Surely, older adults are more susceptible to certain health issues and conditions. Yet, confinement to assistive devices like wheelchairs and canes is not guaranteed. As adults get older, the opportunity to partake in enjoyable physical activity does not disappear. Exercise is defined by physical movement, and since exercise has clear benefits, elderly individuals will reap them if they participate. I will get hurt … Such a myth is baseless in that exercise can and always will be customizable. Physical activity comes in countless variations, and can suit all health concerns and limitations. As is the case for everyone, you do not have overwork your body to achieve the benefits of physical exercise for the elderly. Everyone should consult a doctor before starting a new fitness routine, especially as they age. Doctors and fitness experts are qualified to give insights and advice about personal limitations and abilities. They will work with patients to create the most conducive and healthy regimen clear advantages and suitability. Many exercise options are gentle and relaxing, such as swimming and walking. Water aerobics is one of the most popular forms because it poses the least stress on an aging body. Exercise won’t do much for my health … Physical activity of any sort can have an even greater variety of health benefits for aging adults. For instance, bone density increases around the age of 50,...
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Depression and Anxiety about Aging

There are a number of common signs when it comes to depression, especially in elderly or gaining individuals. For example, you may notice a loved one is expressing negativity or a hopeless attitude, or a growing disinterest in their favorite activities. These changes are not always a natural part of getting older, but often mark symptoms that someone is suffering from depression if they persist. Depression is a serious medical condition with physical and emotional effects on daily life, but can be treated regardless of age, sex or state of health if identified early enough. Understanding Depression Chronic depression is an incessant state when sadness, hopelessness, and anxiety affect someone’s daily life or ability to think about the things most common to them. Chronic depression knows no time restrictions, as it can last several days, weeks or years. When it comes to geriatric depression, it is not a transitory state triggered by grief or worry about one’s mortality. Rather, in older adults, the beginning of depression can go unnoticed until mental and physical side effects are more noticeable by others. Older adults have a higher risk of depression than younger individuals do, so it is important to understand the specific causes and effects. Comprehending Causes A single identifiable cause for depression is impossible to pin down, even though tragic events or high stress levels can trigger the illness. However, depression can also begin in times of peace and tranquility. Depression is classified by changes in neurological chemistry, which brings on alterations in mood and other symptoms. Geriatric depression is most commonly associated with the management of a chronic illness like cancer, heart disease, or Parkinson’s disease. Depression could emerge slowly in these cases, because the struggle to face such conditions transpires daily. Some research indicates that depression has a genetic component, but a history of depression earlier in life generally increases the risk for a re-emergence in old age. Although many other genetic conditions or diseases may not be treatable, depression is manageable if identified and diagnosed early enough. Observing Effects Depression does not just pose mental challenges, but physical ones, especially for elderly individuals. In fact, elders with depression exhibit higher mortality rate than others their age who seem to cope with mortality appropriately. For example, depression can create unhealthy eating habits, memory issues, insomnia, and sluggish reaction times. All of these effects increase the chance for earlier...
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Household Safety In Old Age

Recent studies and research developments are indicating that aging adults are addressing household safety inadequately and infrequently. The harsh reality of getting older is that inhibitive physical changes occur naturally. However, a third of adults over 65 in the United States suffer from a fall, 70% of which occur at home. This makes certain measures necessary if common declines in physical ability increase the risk for dangerous household incidents. Household safety starts at an individual level, for people are the only ones who can make a house safer for themselves. Bathroom Safety The risk of slips and falls is increased by wet tiles or bath and shower floors. Everyone should enter and exit a tub or shower with careful and deliberate movements, even though the transitions are commonplace and routine. For elderly people, one misplaced step can cause some significant damage. Grab-bars can be installed to minimize dependence on bathrooms’ commonly unstable surfaces. Cluttered Space and Stairwell Safety There are a number of ways to increase household safety around hazardous areas like stairwells and walking spaces: Upgrade lighting around the house and especially near stairwells. This will allow for greater visibility, as a poorer view of an area can cause you to stumble or misjudge distances. Remove throw rugs and other unnecessary tapestry on the floor. At the very least, secure area rugs so they do not slip or fold off the floor. Carpets should not have any tears or holes that could someone to trip. Apply non-slip tape to wooden stairs and check handrails to make sure they are sturdy. In general, a house is safer the more support it offers throughout. Keep pathways clear by securing electrical cords against the wall and leaving tables away from high traffic areas. It is too easy to bump into something. Keep items from accumulating in spaces where you walk most frequently. Install light switches closer to room entrances for the easiest access. You should not have to walk across a room in the dark to turn on the light. Bedroom Safety There are a few things you can keep on hand or arrange in your bedroom to make for a safer environment: Have a flashlight close to your bed in case the power goes out or you get up in the middle of the night. A nightlight is useful if you usually get in and out of bed during the...
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